World's Photo Artists For Gender Equality
At the beginning of the 21st century our world still didn't get rid of the different evaluation between the genders. Our campaign's purpose is to draw attention to this important issue of humanity and bring about the importance of change, with the collaboration of the world's photo artists. We dedicate this work to Unicef.

Jason Florio: Secret Home School for Girls

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I was smuggled into a house in the suburbs of Herat, Afghanistan - the Taliban were in control of the city and had put strict laws in place banning education for girls - severe punishments were meted out on those who disobeyed them. Inside the house a group of girls sat in rows, each clutching a book as a volunteer teacher conducted the class. But despite the intense danger, the teacher and the girl’s parents knew the girls must have the opportunity for education, whatever the cost. I often think of this moment; if these parents and teachers could put their lives on the line to operate a secret home school for girls, then we all must find the courage to speak out whenever and wherever we find Gender Equality under attack.

Damir Hoyka: New Millenium Girl

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At my youth, the colloquial symbol of women's equality was being allowed to play football. Today, having 8 women in my immediate surrounding, ranging from 6 to 84 years of age, I have a much detailed picture :) These women are my two young daughters, my older daughter, my wife, my ex-wife, my actual and ex- mother in law and my mom. Most of them have the masters degree and are raised in gender equaly spirit. As a man to get more objective point of view and possible UNICEF inspiration, I asked them to suggest the changes that still need to be done to make women equal. Here are the results: 1. overcome the patriarchal upbringing - female children are sometimes still raised to be beautiful, marry, bear children - they are viewed as objects, and as long as they get older, they lose value 2. stop domestic violence - which is generally much more directed towards women than towards men 3. increase the chances for women to work they way up to the important leadership and decisive functions 4. equalize the salaries for men and women at the same professional positions 5. disintegrate the opinion that young woman's success is questioned and women need to prove much more to be perceived and accepted, especially in business The ones in the kindergarten said that they can do all the same stuff as boys can. The pensioners said the same. Since the gender equality is not a question of only one gender, I am using the opportunity to suggest the subject for the future campaigns. With ever more women having the full profesional agenda, and being with their children sometimes less then fathers, the 'natural' and jurisdictional point of view that children belong to mother has to be reconsidered and estimated carefully from case to case.

Dina Oganova: Silent Garden

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Gender equality became a very popular topic in Georgia in the last decade. For many people it still remains as something unrealistic – the term which exist on papers and has nothing to do with real life. For others gender equality does not seem to be interesting at all – they think we are not facing any challenges in our country in this regards. As a woman, who is a part of Georgian society and who has chosen one of the most male-dominated professions, I often ask myself – what is Gender Equality? What does this combination of words mean in real life? What is behind the papers, resolutions and conventions? How do people benefit from Gender Equality? I think we need Gender Equality everywhere, in our everyday life, in kindergartens and schools, universities and workplaces, streets and stations. To me it means an equal opportunity for girls and boys to complete their education and make informed decisions, for women and men to build their careers, equal engagement of mothers and fathers in upbringing and caregiving of their children. Safe spaces for women, streets and undergrounds where they will not be abused or raped, state which defends rights of women and girls on every level, families which do not force their daughters to get married in early age or against their will – this is real Gender Equality to me, this is what I believe in. Few years ago, when I started working on my project “Silent Garden” (A Girl is Born) with support of UNFPA Georgia, I discovered that there is a radical form of discrimination against girls and women – gender biased sex selection. I discovered that the harmful practice of Gender Biased Sex Selection is still a widespread problem in Georgia. Due to such harmful practice more boys are born in Georgia while the number of girls tends to decrease. According to statistics, if a family choses to have one child, 46% of the citizens prefer the child to be a boy, the gender is unimportant for 45 per cent and just 9 per cent would like to have a baby girl. Presently the ratio of newborn baby girls to baby boys in Georgia is 100 to 110 on average, while the maximum normal biological level of sex ratio at birth can be 100/106. The skewed sex ratio considerably increases in case of third child or more and reaches 100/140. The estimations established that due to such practice about 25,000 girls had not been born in Georgia from 1990 to 2010. My photo project “A Girl is Born” feature the families from different regions of Georgia, having daughters only. The aim of the project is to raise public awareness on the importance of treating male and female children equally, providing them with equal opportunities for development and empowerment for the benefit of the family, society and the country at large. This topic became very personal to me. If you ask me now, what is Gender Equality, I will tell you – when families value girls, when they equally celebrate birth of girls and boys, this is it, this is the real Gender Equality.

Manuel Rivera-Ortiz: Side of the Road

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For me, it is always a somber day every time I have to consider that as a society, we still have to take to giving titles or passing laws to assuage the very things that by now show have been history but still plague humanity. Gender inequality is one of these things. When I think of it, I think immediately about India, the girls born there especially to Dalit castes. It happens that in India, female children are not as wanted as male children when you are poor or living on the streets. You see, as they see it there on the ground in slums like Dharavi or Govandi in Mumbai, a female child requires too much; feeding, clothing, an education, another mouth to feed. Then, in the end, that female child gives back nothing because even marriage for her must be arranged by parents who have little to nothing who are then required to pay a dowry to marry her off! I once saw such a girl, a toddler, one fateful morning floating dead on the fetid waters of the Ganges River in Varanasi while touring the town for Dewali. Shocked, I inquired from my Indian boat guide what might have happened. He said, and these words I'll never forget, that girl children in India suffer such fates especially amongst the poor where at Varanasi some parents drown them to avoid having to take care of them and later pay a dowry on meager means! But that is India. Around the world including in the United States and even in Switzerland, the inequity between male and female continues to plague us down to the real value we place on a feminine workforce; women still get paid less than men for the very same job. Psychologically, whenever a woman achieves the ranks of upper management, we treat them with words that are less than optimal, we call them phrases and names I will not venture here to repeat. I am the oldest of many children, many of whom are female. I can't fathom how bad it must be for them every day, especially when they also happen to be ethnic!

Marta Kochanek: Gender Equality

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Gender inequality consists of a long list of statistics showing the imbalance of power between men and women. In real terms, gender inequality is a major problem on local, national and global levels. Not only does it affect the lives of individual men and women, but the inequality between genders also stunts economic growth and hinders development. Gender equality is achieved when women and men enjoy the same rights and opportunities across all sectors of society, including economic participation and decision-making, and when the different behaviours, aspirations and needs of women and men are equally valued and favoured. I am a Woman; I deserve the same level of respect, opportunities and rights as Men. www.martakochanek.com

Daniel Allender Ripka: Society's Mirror

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I always thought that every soul is equal. Unfortunately, our world does not take it into account yet and discriminate by gender. I believe, that with my passion I can accelerate the change. My creation's title is "Society's Mirror". It symbolizes the inequality which dominates society. www.danielallender.com

Irina Werning: School Girls

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We live in a time where humanity is understanding that every person, as different as they seem to us, should have the same rights and opportunities. I feel very optimistic when I think that future generations will not even discuss this anymore. They will start debating about the rights of animals and every creature on earth. We will have to learn to respect our whole planet in order to survive. That’s our challenge.

Ayman Lofty: Artery

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An artery, trying to sustain life .. struggles to make its way .. and looses direction many times Life moves within it once and then looses course countless times, Silence is its temperament ..yet screaming is its only outlet Alas, there is no one to respond .. but those who seek to obstruct its route.. It shall never stop, but will certainly will continue within the life it has granted life to .. Inside that artery

Bragi Thor: Transformations

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"Self portrait of me and my wife. Gender equalization starts at home and married couples need to share everything and be equal in decision making for the family."

Cássio Vasconcellos: E Nois 3

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From an aerial picture that I made from a crowd, I’ve changed the image increasing its size and, mainly, its color. The whole image is mixed up with variations of pink and blue without a concern with whom gets each color. This symbolises gender equality once its says that we are all the same and we are all together regardless of the color we wear, regardless of our gender. In addition, this image has an singular visual effect that when it is seen from a distance you cannot identify what it is made of, you can only see the mixture between the colours.

Akintunde Akinleye: Grace Adeniyi Ogunyankin

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Grace Adeniyi Ogunyankin is a Nigerian-Canadian. She has a Bachelor’s degree in Psychology and Global Development Studies, a Master’s in Public Administration and a PhD in Gender, Feminist and Women’s Studies. She’s currently an Assistant Professor of Women’s and Gender Studies at Carleton University in Ottawa, Canada. She identifies as an African feminist who is concerned about the coloniality and postcolonial politics of gender, and critiques neo-imperial capitalist domination in Africa and global anti-blackness. Her research investigates place-making and subjectivity through the study of African urbanisms and popular culture. In her study of African urbanisms, she is primarily intrigued by how local engagements with the Africa Rising rhetoric and global aspects of the political economy work together to (re)produce spatial and social inequalities and provoke resistance in African cities. Her research focus on popular culture explores the issues of subjectivity and belonging and the use of Afrofuturism and Afropolitan Imagineering in geographic projects that address the colonial politics of difference.

Achraf Baznani: Inequality

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I believe that the reality of female and male equality in the political and economic fields is a very complex one in my country. Because there is a very large gap between the sexes in various fields, whether political or economic participation, even education, and health.

Isabel Corthier: Behind the veil of inequality

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This world is striving for gender equality, but I notice that in many places in the world some very gender inequal traditions and beliefs are still so deeply integrated in the culture that it takes a shift on different levels to change this. In Guinea as an example- even though illegal for almost 20 years, female genital mutilation is still widely practiced (almost 97%). In Malawi, due to stigma, sex workers are discriminated to get the necessary health care by professional medical staff. Luckily nowadays activists are standing up and thanks to social media, I believe things can change. Often a lack of information keeps people thinking and acting the way they do. That’s why I love to work with these NGO’s cause they make a change. ABOUT THE PHOTO Mary* sex worker, Dedza, 24 years (* not her real name) “Our job is full of risks. There are clients who after sleeping with you refuse to pay. Others deliberately make sure that the condom bursts. Thanks to the MSF one-stop clinic, we no longer experience insults from health workers. Every time we have an issue we get all the necessary help.”

Chilala Moco: Ocipala cutima

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Gender Equality is no less than the basis for building a society free of prejudice and discrimination. My creation is titled "OCIPALA CUTIMA". It means something like "the face of the soul", in Umbundo, a language spoken in central Angola. Let's say that the soul has no gender!!! I decided to work on these two models because of what they represent in my society, and their commitment to the struggle for GENDER EQUALITY. Imanni da Silva, THE WOMAN, actress, writer, contemporary artist and social activist. She has been quite fearless in the struggle for freedoms in general, in a society that is strongly intolerable to women's rights and freedoms. Meirinho Mendes, THE MAN, is an actor and director. A man entirely devoted to culture in general... is also known as being a very open-minded man. “Gender Equality is no less than the basis for building a society free of prejudice and discrimination“

Chloé Kritharas Devienne: The goddess

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Mahshid Afshar, english teacher, 28 years old, refugee from Afghanistan, living in a camp in Athens : '' Its amazing ! Athina is a goddess. We thought that the gods where only men ! "

Andrew Suryono: Solo training

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Nadine was the only girl who practice football with boys in Gresik, Indonesia. Indonesia has a Women's National Football Team. However, most girls who live in smaller cities in Indonesia do not get the opportunity to practice football due to religious doctrines and gender biases affecting government regulations. Despite Nadine's coaches effort in lobbying the government, there were still not allowed to create a dedicated club for girls like Nadine to join. For the time being, Nadine had to train with the boys to keep her passion alive while hoping that someday she'll be able to join a dedicated women's only club.

Claudio Edinger: Brazil

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For me the question of gender is already resolved. No one really chooses if he or she is male or female. It is pre-determined as much as a photographer doesn’t choose to take photos — that’s who he is. Any disrespect of one’s choices is as absurd as condemning someone for being a doctor — or a nurse (male or female)! We are what we are and we should, as the Beatles so well put it, Let Others be! One cannot be judged by the color of his skin (we are all red inside anyway) or his gender. We should be judged by our moral commitment, by our ethics in relationship with others and with our planet.

Zuzu Valla: Love is everything

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The quality meets at one point - under the roof, under the net, under the sun.. In between, we fight - the world! We prove, or at least we try to prove. We have to justify ourselves, we compare, we balance words and thoughts of our consciousness and all underlining messages of this world. Our true self gets distorted, challenged and tweaked - in comparison with some universal language of this world. As the day goes by, we are exposed to the lonely existence. But this is only because we are alone - without the other complementary part of us. At the end of the physical day, both entities have to bring their qualities to the family table, to be matched, to be equalised, to meet and merge.. and to emerge in celebration of love and unity.. perhaps understanding and forgiveness. Both exhausted.. The day is over, the fight with this world is over - only us at the table, understanding each other without words. The universal language of love.. Man should always protect woman, and woman should respect the man, we need each other, therefore we should be equal and always give love to each other.

Filip Naudts & Julie O'yang: Dorya Glenn

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True equality means holding everyone accountable in the same way, regardless of race, gender, faith, ethnicity - or political ideology. We have created an icon that embodies equality the artists envision and urge for in our globalizing world. The weapon in Dorya’s hand doesn’t stage violence, but it is her urgent demand for tolerance and justice. Dorya wears a semi-transparent costume because she fully embraces individuality and transparency.

Alex Niragira: Hand

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"Gender Equality is a physical and psychological environment in which chances and opportunities offered in life don’t slip out off one’s hand, just because one was born a girl or a boy."

Sebastian Gil Miranda: Shooting for Equality

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Football is a prohibited sport for women in Muslim culture. In northern Kenya, in Marsabit county, one of the most warlike territories in the country, a group of women challenge these precepts and fight for equal rights, becoming also a symbol against armed struggles with the slogan: "shoot to score, not to kill".

Swarup Chatterjee: Sister

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Turtuk, is one of the northernmost village of India situated in the Leh district of Jammu and Kashmir located in the Nubra tehsil, 205 km from Leh, on the banks of the Shyok River. It is the only Balti region under the Indian administration on which India gained control over after the 1971 war with Pakistan. Geographically, Turtuk lies in the Baltistan Region and is one among four such villages in India, the other three being Tyakshi, Chalunkha and Thang. The residents of Turtuk and its adjoining villages speak Balti language along with Ladakhi and Urdu. Turtuk is the last outpost of India at Thang after which Pakistan-controlled Gilgit-Baltistan begins. Turtuk is one of the gateways to the Siachen Glacier. Turtuk is also very famous for the availability of different varieties of fruits especially apricots. While in Ladakh, adopting birth control is often considered unholy, in Turtuk, it is also customary on the girl child (irrespective of the age) to take care of her male sibling. Here are three photographs of sisters taking care of their younger brothers in Turtuk. The photographs were shot during the third week of July 2019 at Turtuk. In a world conscious of gender equality, there are still areas where gender plays a huge role in terms of division of social responsibilities. As a photographer, while I came across numerous such situations wherein sisters were cradling their brothers, I didn’t come across a single occasion where I could see the opposite.

Gender Equality Campaign © 2019